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The debate over marriage equality for same-sex couples rages across the country. Beyond (Straight and Gay) Marriage boldly moves the discussion forward by focusing on the larger, more fundamental issue of marriage and the law. The root problem, asserts law professor and LGBT rights activist Nancy Polikoff, is that marriage is a bright dividing line between those relationships that legally matter and those that don’t. A woman married to a man for nine months is entitled to Social Security survivor’s benefits when he dies; a woman living for nineteen years with a man or woman to whom she is not married receives nothing.
Polikoff reframes the debate by arguing that all family relationships and households need the economic stability and emotional peace of mind that now extend only to married couples. Unmarried couples of any sexual orientation, single-parent households, extended family units, and myriad other familial configurations need recognition and protection to meet the concerns they all share: building and sustaining economic and emotional interdependence, and nurturing the next generation. Couples should have the choice to marry based on the spiritual, cultural, or religious meaning of marriage in their lives, asserts Polikoff.
While marriage equality for same-sex couples is a civil rights victory, she contends that no one should have to marry in order to reap specific and unique legal results. A persuasive argument that married couples should not receive special rights denied to other families, Polikoff shows how the law can value all families, and why it must.

[PDF]

The debate over marriage equality for same-sex couples rages across the country. Beyond (Straight and Gay) Marriage boldly moves the discussion forward by focusing on the larger, more fundamental issue of marriage and the law. The root problem, asserts law professor and LGBT rights activist Nancy Polikoff, is that marriage is a bright dividing line between those relationships that legally matter and those that don’t. A woman married to a man for nine months is entitled to Social Security survivor’s benefits when he dies; a woman living for nineteen years with a man or woman to whom she is not married receives nothing.

Polikoff reframes the debate by arguing that all family relationships and households need the economic stability and emotional peace of mind that now extend only to married couples. Unmarried couples of any sexual orientation, single-parent households, extended family units, and myriad other familial configurations need recognition and protection to meet the concerns they all share: building and sustaining economic and emotional interdependence, and nurturing the next generation. Couples should have the choice to marry based on the spiritual, cultural, or religious meaning of marriage in their lives, asserts Polikoff.

While marriage equality for same-sex couples is a civil rights victory, she contends that no one should have to marry in order to reap specific and unique legal results. A persuasive argument that married couples should not receive special rights denied to other families, Polikoff shows how the law can value all families, and why it must.

[PDF]

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blackandyellowdoodles:

i’m probably late to the party but i just came across this video.

it’s a snippet of a documentary and shows how badly people are treated by the doctors who are charged with them.

this was at charing cross clinic (where i will be going) over 20 years ago, but some of the comments on the video suggest it hasn’t changed much…

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Queer Xicana Indígena cultural production: Remembering through oral and visual storytelling by Susy J. Zepeda

This article traces oral and visual stories of queer Xicana Indígena artists to address colonial forms of epistemic violence or missing memory. Queer Xicana Indígenas enact forms of remembering through their art to regain cultural and ancestral memory and story. Often times, it is through collaboration and ceremony across generations and with sacred elements that the stories are formed and hidden histories are unearthed.

This article demonstrates how art and cultural production can be a form of decolonization. By focusing on the vision of transformation of queer Indigenous artists and cultural producers, I demonstrate how they construct decolonized knowledge that simultaneously reconceptualizes the past, present, and future for Xican@s and Latin@s. Significantly, the historical memory constructed by these cultural producers offer critiques of U.S. and transnational systems of domination that are ultimately expressed in their writing, sculptures, films, and spiritual practices.

For example, the art analyzed here, particularly Gina Aparicio’s clay sculptures, offers a direct avenue to examine the conflated history of heteropatriarchy, nationalism, and settler colonialism through the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the subsequent re-colonizing of the land.

"When a trans person is ridiculed or dismissed not merely for failing to live up to gender norms, but for their expressions of femaleness or femininity, they become the victims of a specific form of discrimination: trans-misogyny. When the majority of jokes made at the expense of trans people center on “men wearing dresses” or “men who want their penises cut off,” that is not transphobia—it is trans-misogyny. When the majority of violence and sexual assaults committed against trans people is directed at trans women, that is not transphobia—it is trans-misogyny. When it’s okay for women to wear “men’s” clothing, but when men who wear “women’s” clothing can be diagnosed with the psychological disorder transvestic fetishism, that is not transphobia—it is trans-misogyny. When women’s or lesbian organizations and events open their doors to trans men but not trans women, that is not transphobia—it is trans-misogyny."

Trans Woman Manifesto, from Whipping Girl, by Julia Serrano  (via foucaultatthedisco)

(Source: kurosakihisoka)

thematerialworld:

Can we make it a tradition to watch Sylvia Rivera’s 1973 Pride March speech on the day of the NYC LGBT Pride Parade every year?  

"What the fuck’s wrong with you all?  Think about that!"

FREE LGBTQPIA

Anonymous said: Wait......We have a separate culture?

biresourcecenter:

We absolutely do! The bisexual community has a rich and vibrant history, from books and other publications, to media figures, to activists, to politicians, the list goes on and on. Here are a few recommended links to take a peek at:

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Transgender studies is the latest area of academic inquiry to grow out of the exciting nexus of queer theory, feminist studies, and the history of sexuality. Because trans people challenge our most fundamental assumptions about the relationship between bodies, desire, and identity, the field is both fascinating and contentious. The Transgender Studies Reader puts between two covers fifty influential texts with new introductions by the editors that, taken together, document the evolution of transgender studies in the English-speaking world. By bringing together the voices and experience of transgender individuals, doctors, psychologists and academically-based theorists, this volume will be a foundational text for the transgender community, transgender studies, and related queer theory.

[PDF]

Transgender studies is the latest area of academic inquiry to grow out of the exciting nexus of queer theory, feminist studies, and the history of sexuality. Because trans people challenge our most fundamental assumptions about the relationship between bodies, desire, and identity, the field is both fascinating and contentious. The Transgender Studies Reader puts between two covers fifty influential texts with new introductions by the editors that, taken together, document the evolution of transgender studies in the English-speaking world. By bringing together the voices and experience of transgender individuals, doctors, psychologists and academically-based theorists, this volume will be a foundational text for the transgender community, transgender studies, and related queer theory.

[PDF]

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"

Jesus and Queerness

Queerness fits naturally with the life and teachings of Jesus Christ. The New Testament shows that Jesus stood in solidarity with those on the margins of society, keeping many of his harshest words for the rich, the powerful and religious hypocrites.

Jesus challenged the sexual conventions of his day. He allowed women to make physical contact with him in a culture that found it shocking. He socialised with prostitutes. He criticised divorce in a society in which only a man could initiate a divorce, often throwing his wife into social disgrace and poverty. He made clear that sexual ethics are about people’s hearts as well as their bodies. He redefined family, saying that whoever does the will of God is his brother, sister and mother.

Early Christians gradually moved away from Jesus’ radicalism. Christianity was domesticated by the Roman Empire in the fourth century, beginning a long period of Christendom, in which the Church became associated with wealth and power. As Christianity moves from the centre of power in a multicultural society, we have an excellent opportunity to look again at the radical teachings of Jesus.

We believe that the homophobia and sexism displayed by certain forms of Christianity are a distortion of the Gospel. At the same time, influential views in our society continue to uphold binary gender, along with a shallow, comercialised approach to sexuality. Queers for Jesus aim to challenge dominant views in both Church and society. We hope that we are also open to being challenged and to learning from others with different perspectives.

"

http://queersforjesus.wordpress.com/jesus-and-queerness/ (via ramblingsofachristianqueer)

odofemi:

Jayne County talking about trans and queer life in New York City in the 1960s. She explains the “sex searches” police would conduct on drag queens and trans women during gay bar raids, making people expose their genitals to the police.